a name that uniquely identifies someone on a computer system. For example, a computer may be setup with multiple accounts, with different usernames for each account. Many websites allow users to choose a username so that they can customize their settings or set up an online account. For example, your bank may allow you to choose a username for accessing your banking information. You may need to choose a username in order to post messages to a certain message board on the Web. E-mail services, such as Hotmail require users to choose a username in order to use the service.A username is almost always paired with apassword. This username/password combination is referred to as alogin, and is often required for users to log in to websites. For example, to access your e-mail via the Web, you are required to enter your username and password. Once you have logged in, your username may appear on the screen, but your password is kept secret. By keeping their password private, people can create secure accounts for various websites. Most usernames can contain letters and numbers, but no spaces. When you choose a username for an e-mail account, the part before the "@" is your username.
User-friendly describes a hardware device or software interface that is easy to use. It is "friendly" to the user, meaning it is not difficult to learn or understand.

User interface:A user interface, also called a "UI" or simply an "interface," is the means in which a person controls a software
or hardware device. A good user interface provides a "user-friendly" experience, allowing the user to interact with the software or hardware in a natural and intuitive way.URL:
Stands for "Uniform Resource Locator." A URL is the address of a specific Web site or file on the Internet. It cannot have spaces or certain other characters and uses forward slashes to denote different directories. Some examples of URLs are,, and As you can see, not all URLs begin with "http". The first part of a URL indicates what kind of resource it is addressing. Here is a list of the different resource prefixes:
  • http - a hypertext directory or document (such as aWeb page)
  • ftp - a directory of files or an actual file available to download
  • gopher - a gopher document or menu
  • telnet - a Unix-based computer system that you can log into
  • news - a newsgroup
  • WAIS - a database or document on a Wide Area Information Search database
  • file - a file located on your hard drive or some other local drive
The second part of a URL (after the "://") contains the address of the computer being located as well as the path to the file. For example, in "," "" is the address or domain name of the host computer and "/Content/Reports/index.html" is the path to the file. When a address ends with a slash and not something like ".html" or ".php," the Web server typically defaults to a file in the current directory named "index.html," "index.htm," or "index.php." So, if you type in "" and "," you should get the same page. Go ahead and try it if you have nothing better to do.