RAID :
Stands for "Redundant Array of Independent Disks." RAID is a method of storing data on multiple hard disks. When disks are arranged in a RAID configuration, the computer sees them all as one large disk. However, they operate much more efficiently than a single hard drive. Since the data is spread out over multiple disks, the reading and writing operations can take place on multiple disks at once. This can speed up hard drive access time significantly. Multiple hard drives may not improve hard disk performace as much as multiple processors may enhance the CPU performance, but it is based on a similar logic.
RAM- used for creating, loading, and running programs and for manipulating and temporarily storing data; main memory.

Remote User: a remote user is someone who works on a computer from a remote location.

Real-Time:

When an event or function is processed instantaneously, it is said to occur in real-time. To say something takes place in real-time is the same as saying it is happening "live" or "on-the-fly." For example, the graphics in a 3D action game are rendered in real-time by the computer's
video card
. This means the graphics are updated so quickly, there is no noticeable delay experienced by the user. While some computer systems may be capable of rendering more frames per second than other systems, the graphics are still being processed in real-time.

Resolution:
This term can describe either how many pixels a monitor can display or how fine a printer can print.
1. A small monitor may have a resolution or 640 x 480, which means there are 640 pixels horizontally across the screen and 480 pixels vertically. Some other common monitor resolutions are 800 x 600, 1,024 x 768, and 1,280 x 1,024. The higher the resolution, the more that can be displayed on the screen.
2. Printer resolution measures how fine a printer can print. This measurement is known as dots per inch, or "dpi." The greater the dpi, the better the image clarity. Scanner resolution is also measured in dpi.


Raw Data:
Raw data is unprocessed computer data. This information may be stored in a file, or may just be a collection of numbers and characters stored on somewhere in the computer's hard disk. For example, information entered into a database is often called raw data. The data can either be entered by a user or generated by the computer itself. Because it has not been processed by the computer in any way, it is considered to be "raw data." To continue the culinary analogy, data that has been processed by the computer is sometimes referred to as "cooked data."
RGB:
Stands for "Red Green Blue." It refers to the three hues of light (red, green, and blue, for those of you that are a little slow), that can mix together to form any color. When the highest intensity of each color is mixed together, white light is created. When each hue is set to zero intensity, the result is black. TVs and computer monitors use RGB to create the colorful images you see on the screen. In print, however, the 4 colors -- cyan, yellow, magenta, and black (CYMK) -- are used to create color images.


Rickrolling:

Rickrolling is an Internet meme[1] involving the music video for the 1987 Rick Astley song "Never Gonna Give You Up". The meme is a bait and switch; a person provides a hyperlink which is seemingly relevant to the topic at hand, but actually leads to Astley's video. The link can be masked or obfuscated in some manner so that the user cannot determine the true destination of the link without clicking. People led to the music video are said to have been rickrolled. Rickrolling has extended beyond web links to playing the video or song disruptively in other situations, including public places, such as a live appearance of Astley himself in the 2008 Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York.[1] The meme helped to revive Astley's career.[2]

Router:
This is a hardware device that routes data (hence the name) from a local area network (LAN) to another network connection. A router acts like a coin sorting machine, allowing only authorized machines to connect to other computer systems. Most routers also keep log files about the local network activity.

RTE:
Stands for "Runtime Environment." As soon as a software program is executed, it is in a runtime state. In this state, the program can send instructions to the computer's processor and access the computer's memory (RAM) and other system resources. When software developers write programs, they need to test them in the runtime environment. Therefore, software development programs often include an RTE component that allows the programmer to test the program while it is running. This allows the program to be run in an environment where the programmer can track the instructions being processed by the program and debug any errors that may arise. If the program crashes, the RTE software keeps running and may provide important information about why the program crashed. When you see the name of a software program with the initials "RTE" after it, it usually means the software includes a runtime environment.



Runtime:

Runtime is the period of time when a program is running. It begins when a program is opened (or executed) and ends with the program is quit or closed.
Runtime is a technical term, used most often in software development. It is commonly seen in the context of a "runtime error," which is an error that occurs while a program is running. The term "runtime error" is used to distinguish from other types of errors, such as syntax errors and compiliation errors, which occur before a program is run