QBE:Stands for "Query By Example." QBE is a feature included with various database applications that provides a user-friendly method of running database queries. Typically without QBE, a user must write input commands using correct SQL (Structured Query Language) syntax. This is a standard language that nearly all database programs support. However, if the syntax is slightly incorrect the query may return the wrong results or may not run at all.
The Query By Example feature provides a simple interface for a user to enter queries. Instead of writing an entire SQL command, the user can just fill in blanks or select items to define the query she wants to perform. For example, a user may want to select an entry from a table called "Table1" with an ID of 123. Using SQL, the user would need to input the command, "SELECT * FROM Table1 WHERE ID = 123". The QBE interface may allow the user to just click on Table1, type in "123" in the ID field and click "Search."

Query:

Query is another word for question. In fact, outside of computing terminology, the words "query" and "question" can be used interchangeably. For example, if you need additional information from someone, you might say, "I have a query for you." In computing, queries are also used to retrieve information. However, computer queries are sent to a computer system and are processed by a software programrather than a person.
One type of query, which many people perform multiple times a day, is a search query. Each time you search for something using a search engine, you perform a search query. When you press Enter, the keywords are sent to the search engine and are processed using an algorithm that retrieves related results from the search index. The results of your query appear on a search engine results page, or SERP.
Another common type of query is a database query. Databases store data in a structured format, which can be accessed using queries. In fact, the structured query language (SQL) was designed specifically for this purpose. Users can create SQL queries that retrieve specific information from a database. For example, an human resources manager may perform a query on an employee database that selects all employees in a specific department that were hired between 11 and 12 months ago. The results might be used to provide the department head with current candidates for an annual review.
While you may not always notice them, computer queries are happening all the time. For instance, most dynamic websites query a database each time you visit a new page. Software applicationsoften contain background functions that perform queries based on your input. While many types of computer queries exist, their basic purpose is the same — to receive an answer to a question.
NOTE: The word "query" can be used as either noun or a verb. For example, you can "perform a search query" or "query a database." Both examples are correct uses of the word "query."

Queue:
A queue is a list of jobs that are awaiting to be processed. When a job is sent to a queue, it is simply added to the list of jobs. Computer programs often work with queues as a way to order tasks. For example, when the CPU finishes one computation, it will process the next one in the queue. A printer queue is a list of documents that are waiting to be printed. When you decide to print a document, it is sent to the printer queue. If there are no jobs currently in the queue, the document will be printed immediately. However, if there are jobs already in the queue, the new document will be added to the list and printed when the others have finished. Most printers today come with software that allows you to manually sort, cancel, and add jobs to the printer queue.






QWERTY:
This term is used to describe a standard (Latin alphabet-based) keyboard. Why? Because the first six keys in the upper-left part of the keyboard spell out Q-W-E-R-T-Y. I suppose you could call it a QWERTYUIOP keyboard, but QWERTY is a lot easier to say. In case you are wondering why the QWERTY keyboard is arranged like it is, the original reason was to reduce the jamming of typebars in typewriters as they moved to strike the paper.
In 1932, August Dvorak developed what was intended to be a more efficient keyboard, in which he placed the vowels and the five most common consonants in the middle row, based on the idea that an alternating rhythm would be established between the right and left hands. Though the keys on the Dvorak keyboard were more efficienty arranged, it was and still is too much of a pain for people to switch from the familiar QWERTY arrangement. So, it looks like we're stuck with what we have. Sorry Dvorak.Quad-Core:
A quad-core CPU has four processing cores in a single chip. It is similar to a dual-core CPU, but has four separate processors (rather than two), which can process instructions at the same time.
Quad-core CPUs have become more popular in recent years as the clock speeds of processors have plateaued. By including multiple cores in a single CPU, chip manufacturers can generate higher performance without boosting the clock speed. However, the performance gain can only be realized if the computer's software supports multiprocessing. This allows the software to split the processing load between multiple processors (or "cores") instead of only using one processor at a time. Fortunately, most modern operating systems and many programs provide support for multiprocessing.
Some examples of quad-core CPUs include the Intel Core 2 Quad, Intel Nehalem, and AMD Phenom X4 processors. The Intel processors are used in Mac, Windows, and Linux systems, while the AMD processors are only used in Windows and Linux systems. While four cores may seems impressive, some high end computers have two quad-core CPUs, giving them a total of eight processing cores. Now that is some core power!