Lag:

Lag is a slow response from a computer. It can be used to describe any computer that is responding slower than expected. However, the term is most commonly used in online gaming.
Video game lag is generally caused by one of two factors – 1) a slow computer or 2) a slow Internet connection. If you are playing an online multiplayer game and your computer cannot process the incoming data in real-time, it may slow the game down for everyone. If your Internet connection is slow or inconsistent (which is common with a shared wirelessconnection), your system may not send and receive enough data to keep up with other players. This lag may produce choppy frame rates and cause a delay between your input and what happens on the screen.
In an ideal world, all online gamers would have fast computers and fast Internet connections. The reality, however, is that players have a variety of computer systems and significantly differentInternet connection speeds. Therefore, video game developers must account for lag in multiplayer games. The preferred method is to make sure lag only affects the individual with the slow computer or Internet connection. This prevents players with high-quality gaming setups from being negatively affected by users with slow systems.
Lan- Stands for "Local Area Network," A LAN is a computer network limited to a small area such as an office building, university, or even a residential home.
Laser Printer:

A laser printer is a printer that uses a focused beam or light to transfer text and images onto paper. Though contrary to popular belief, the laser does not actually burn the images onto the paper. Instead, as paper passes through the printer, the laser beam fires at the surface of a cylindrical drum called a photoreceptor. This drum has an electrical charge (typically positive), that is reversed in areas where the laser beam hits it. By reversing the charge in certain areas of the drum, the laser beam can print patterns (such as text and pictures) onto the photoreceptor.
Once the pattern has been created on the drum, it is coated with toner from a toner cartridge. The toner is black in most cartridges, but may be cyan, magenta, and yellow in color laser printers. The positively charged toner clings to areas of the drum that have been negatively charged by the laser. When the paper passes through the printer, the drum is given a strong negative charge, which allows the toner to transfer and stick to the paper. The result is a clean copy of the image written on the paper.
Because laser printers do not use ink, they have less image smearing problems than inkjet printers and are able to print pages faster. While laser printers and toner cartridges typically cost more than inkjet printers and ink cartridges, most laser toner cartridges last several times longer than ink cartridges, which makes their cost per page about equal. For this reason, businesses tend to use laser printers, while consumers are more likely to use inkjet printers. Laser printers typically have a resolution of 600 dpi (dots per inch) or higher.


Latency: This is the amount of time it takes a packet of data to move across a network connection. When a packet is being sent, there is "latent" time, when the computer that sent the packet waits for confirmation that the packet has been received. Latency and bandwidth are the two factors that determine your network connection speed.


Leaf:
Directories of files and folders on a hard drive are organized into branches, where each directory is a branch with files and folders. Folders make up the branches, while files are the leaves. Therefore a leaf is a file within a directory on your hard drive.Technically speaking, a leaf is a node on a tree with no child nodes. Because files cannot have child nodes like folders can, they are always leafs. When referring to a tree structure, a leaf can also be called a leaf node.


Leopard:Leopard is another name for Mac OS X 10.5, which was released on October 26, 2007. It followed Mac OS X 10.4 Tiger and preceded the release of Mac OS X 10.6Snow Leopard.

Mac OS X Leopard was one of the most significant updates to Mac OS X, with over 300 new features. Some of the most notable additions include Time Machine (an automated backup solution), Spaces (a virtual desktop environment), and Quick Look (a feature that allows many file types to be viewed directly in the Finder by pressing space bar. Leopard was also the first version of Mac OS X to include Boot Camp, a feature that allows you to run Windows on your Mac.

Besides the above features, Leopard also provided several enhancements to existing Mac OS X software. For example, RSS feed support was added to Mail, advanced photo filters were added to Photo Booth, and the Spotlight search feature added support for boolean operators. Leopard also shipped with Safari 3, the third major release of Apple's web browser.

The final Leopard software update was 10.5.8, released on August 5, 2009.


Lightning: is a proprietary I/O interface designed by Apple for its mobile devices, such as the iPhone, iPad, and iPod. It was first introduced in September, 2012, with the iPhone 5 and new iPod models.
LinkedIn:LinkedIn is a social networking website designed for business professionals. It allows you to share work-related information with other users and keep an online list of professional contacts.
Like Facebook and MySpace, LinkedIn allows you to create a custom profile. However, profiles created within LinkedIn are business-oriented rather than personal. For example, a LinkedIn profile highlights education and past work experience, which makes it appear similar to a resume. Profiles also list the your connections to other LinkedIn users, as well as recommendations you make or receive from other users.
By using LinkedIn, you can keep in touch with past and current colleagues, which can be useful in today's ever-changing work environment. You can also connect with new people when looking for potential business partners. While people outside your personal network cannot view your full profile, they can still view a snapshot of your education and work experience. They can also contact you using LinkedIn's anonymous "InMail" messaging service, which could lead to new job opportunities.
LinkedIn has several benefits for business professionals, which is why it is used by millions of people across the world. Just remember, if you decide to create a LinkedIn profile, keep your information professional. It's best to save your personal information for the other social networking websites.

Lossless:
Lossless compression reduces a file's size with no loss of quality. This seemingly magical method of reducing file sizes can be applied to both image and audio files. While JPEGs and MP3s use lossy compression, newer compression algorithms, such as JPEG 2000 and Apple Lossless compression, can be used to create lossless compressed files.
Lossless compression basically rewrites the data of the original file in a more efficient way. However, because no quality is lost, the resulting files are typically much larger than image and audio files compressed with lossy compression. For example, a file compressed using lossy compression may be one tenth the size of the original, while lossless compression is unlikely to produce a file smaller than half of the original size.


Lossy:
Lossy file compression results in lost data and quality from the original version. Lossy compression is typically associated with image files, such as JPEGs, but can also be used for audio files, like MP3s or AAC files. The "lossyness" of an image file may show up as jagged edges or pixelated areas. In audio files, the lossyness may produce a watery sound or reduce the dynamic range of the audio.
Because lossy compression removes data from the original file, the resulting file often takes up much less disk space than the original. For example, a JPEG image may reduce an image's file size by more than 80%, with little noticeable effect. Similarly, a compressed MP3 file may be one tenth the size of the original audio file and may sound almost identical.



LUN:
Stands for "Logical Unit Number." LUNs are used to identify SCSI devices, such as external hard drives, connected to a computer. Each device is assigned a LUN, from 0 to 7, which serves as the device's unique address.