Keylogger:

A keylogger is a program that records the keystrokes on a computer. It does this by monitoring a user's input and keeping a log of all keys that are pressed. The log may saved to a file or even sent to another machine over a network or the Internet.
Keylogger programs are often deemed spyware because they usually run without the user knowing it. They can be maliciously installed by hackers to spy on what a user is typing. By examining the keylog data, it may be possible to find private information such as a username and password combination. Therefore, keyloggers can be a significant security risk if they are unknowingly installed on a computer.

Kilobit:

A kilobit is 103 or 1,000 bits.
One kilobit (abbreviated "Kb") contains one thousand bits and there are 1,000 kilobits in a megabit. Kilobits (Kb) are smaller than than kilobytes (KB), since there are 8 kilobits in a single kilobyte. Therefore, a kilobit is one-eighth the size of a kilobyte.

Kibibyte:

A kibibyte is a unit of data storage that equals 2 to the 10th power, or 1,024 bytes.
While a kilobyte can be estimated as 10^3 or 1,000 bytes, a kibibyte is exactly 1,024 bytes. This is to avoid the ambiguity associated with the size of kilobytes. A kibibyte is 1,024 bytes and precedes themebibyte unit of measurement.
For a list of other units of measurements, view thisHelp Center article.
Abbreviation: KiB

Kilobyte:

The kilobyte (symbol: KiB or kB) is a multiple of the unit byte for digital information. Although the prefix kilo- means 1000, the term kilobyte and the symbols kB or KBhave historically been used to refer to either 1024 (210) bytes or 1000 (103) bytes, dependent upon context, in the fields of computer science and information technology.[1][2][3]


Kindle:
The Kindle is a portable e-reader developed by Amazon.com. It allows you to download and read digital books, newspapers, magazines, and other electronic publications. The Kindle also includes a built-in speaker and headphone jack for listening to audiobooks or background music.
The first Kindle was released in November 2007 and several updated versions have been released since then. Each Kindle, except for the Kindle Fire, uses special type of display called "E Ink" or electronic paper. Unlike a typical laptop screen or computer monitor, the E Ink display is monochrome and has no backlight. Instead, it has a light-colored background and text and images are displayed in grayscale. The result is a paper-like display that can be easily viewed in bright sunlight.
You can download content to a Kindle using the built-in Wi-Fi connection (available in Kindles released in 2010 or later) or Amazon's proprietary 3G Whispernet network. This Whispernet network is a free service provided by Amazon.com to Kindle users and does not require a wireless subscription. Amazon.com also provides a "Whispersync" that allows users to wirelessly sync data between multiple Kindle devices.
While the Kindle was originally designed as a basic e-reader, each iteration has provided more functionality. For example, recent versions of the Kindle include a web browser, which allows you to view websites. The Kindle Fire, which was introduced in September 2011, is as much as tablet as an e-reader, since it has a colortouchscreen and runs the Android operating system. Kindle Fire users can also download apps directly from the Amazon.com Appstore.