I/O address:

Each I/O device connected to your computer is mapped to a unique I/O (Input/Output) address. These addresses are assigned to every I/O port on your computer, including USB, Firewire, Ethernet, VGA, and DVI ports, as well as any other ports your computer might have.
Having a unique address assigned to each port allows your computer to easily recognize and locate devices attached to your computer. Whether it is a keyboard, mouse, monitor, printer, or any other device, the computer can locate it by its I/O address. Because I/O addresses are controlled by the computer's motherboard, they do not use up any system memory, or RAM.

Installer:
In order to install new software on your computer, you often need to run an installer program. This program unpacks compressed data included with the installer and writes new information to your hard drive. While some installers do not use compressed data, most use some level of compression since it reduces the size of the files included with the installer. This is especially helpful when downloading programs or software updates from the Internet.
INTERFACE:
  1. A user interface, consisting of the set of dials, knobs, operating system commands, graphical display formats, and other devices provided by a computer or a program to allow the user to communicate and use the computer or program. A graphical user interface (GUI) provides its user a more or less "picture-oriented" way to interact with technology. A GUI is usually a more satisfying or user-friendly interface to a computer system.

IOS-
iOS is a mobile operating system developed by Apple. It was originally named the iPhone OS, but was renamed to the iOS in June, 2009. The iOS currently runs on the iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad.
Like modern desktop operating systems, iOS uses a graphical user interface, or GUI. However, since it is a mobile operating system, iOS is designed aroundtouchscreen input, rather than a keyboard and mouse. For example, applications, or "apps," can be opened by a single tap, rather than a double-click. Different screens can be viewed by swiping your finger across the screen, rather than clicking on open windows.
Since iOS is designed to be simple and easy to use, it does not include several features found in a traditional operating system. For example, you cannot manage files and folders like you can inMac OS X or Windows. You also have limited access to iOS system settings. Instead of modifying application preferences from within each program, most settings need to be adjusted within the Settings app. Additionally, while you can run multiple programs at once, you can only view one open program at a time.
While Apple's iOS provides a more basic user interface than Mac OS X, each new version adds more features. For example, iOS 2 provided access to the App Store, which allowed users to download and install third-party apps on their iPhones. iOS 3 added copy and paste functionality and iPad support. iOS 4 was the first version to support multitasking and added the GameCenter feature. iOS 5 introduced the Siri voice assistant (only available on the iPhone 4S), and provided new cloud connectivity features.
IPv6:
Every computer system and device connected to the Internet is located by an IP address. The current system of distributing IP addresses is called IPv4. This system assigns each computer a 32-bit numeric address, such as 120.121.123.124. However, with the growth of computers connected to the Internet, the number of available IP addresses are predicted to run out in only a few years. This is why IPv6 was introduced.
IPv6, also called IPng (or IP Next Generation), is the next planned version of the IP address system. (IPv5 was an experimental version used primarily for streaming data.) While IPv4 uses 32-bit addresses, IPv6 uses 128-bit addresses, which increases the number of possible addresses by an exponential amount. For example, IPv4 allows 4,294,967,296 addresses to be used (2^32). IPv6 allows for over 340,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 IP addresses. That should be enough to last awhile.
Because IPv6 allows for substantially more IP addresses than IPv4, the addresses themselves are more complex. They are typically written in this format:
hhhh:hhhh:hhhh:hhhh:hhhh:hhhh:hhhh:hhhh
Each "hhhh" section consists of a four-digit hexadecimal number, which means each digit can be from 0 to 9 and from A to F. An example IPv6 address may look like this:
F704:0000:0000:0000:3458:79A2:D08B:4320
Because IPv6 addresses are so complex, the new system also adds extra security to computers connected to the Internet. Since there are so may IP address possibilities, it is nearly impossible to guess the IP address of another computer. While most computer systems today support IPv6, the new Internet procotol has yet to be fully implemented. During this transitional process, computers are often assigned both an IPv4 and an IPv6 address. By 2008, the U.S. government has mandated that all government systems use IPv6 addresses, which should help move the transition along.

ISP: Stands for "Internet Service Provider." In order to connect to the Internet, you need an ISP. It is the company that you (or your parents) pay a monthly fee to in order to use the Internet. If you use a dial-up modem to connect to your ISP, a point-to-point protocol (PPP) connection is established with another modem on the ISP's end. That modem connects to one of the ISP's routers, which routes you to the Internet "backbone." From there, you can access information from anywhere around the world. DSL and cable modems work the same way, except after you connect the first time, you are always connected.


iTunes:
iTunes is an audio playback program developed by Apple Computer. You can use iTunes to import songs from CDs as well as other audio files from your hard drive. The program can also download songs (for a small fee) from the iTunes Music Store. While songs are the most common files played by iTunes, you can also play spoken word files, such as audio books or other recordings. iTunes also has a radio option that allows you to play live streams of Internet radio from a variety of stations.
Each file you import with iTunes get stored in the iTunes library. Fortunately, the library can be organized into multiple playlists, which is especially helpful when you have thousands of songs. (Yes, some people have over 10,000 songs in their library.) You can also create "smart playlists," which store songs according to the parameters you set. For example, if you want a playlist of only rock music, you can create a smart playlist that only holds songs where the "Genre" tag contains "Rock." iTunes is the software that comes with the iPod, and allows you to transfer your playlists from your computer to your iPod. Like the iPod, iTunes can be used on a Mac or PC.